B1 – 90 Garry St. Winnipeg, MB R3C 4H1 - Phone: (204) 478-6644, Fax: 204-478-6677 - info@indep.ca

Archive for November, 2014

Assessing Our Home Assessments Through Q&A

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Disabled rehabilitationA significant injury or illness is never a welcome circumstance. However, for thousands of Canadians, such an occurrence is an inevitability that requires significant rehabilitation. Naturally, time must be taken from work to battle such hardships, as a person’s health always comes first. This is why before a person returns to work, he or she must take the very important steps to ensure that the return to work is done at the appropriate time.

At Independence Incorporated, we offer Home Assessments as one of our many services. It’s important that individuals are able to perform all of the necessary functions that are required for living in their homes before they are able to get back on the job. As part of our assessments, we address issues such as accessibility and stressors – both actual and perceived. We also look to determine the number of responsibilities that may affect a person’s ability to handle everyday tasks.

Once an appropriate home assessment has been completed, we are better able to gauge whether or not a person who has sustained an injury or illness that has kept him or her from work is able to return to the job. As you can imagine, there are a number of questions that need to be both asked and answered in order to make the right decision. At Independence Incorporated, we seek to complete thorough examinations by performing a Q&A session.

Has there been a significant change in the working conditions? Depending on the amount of time that a person has taken off of work, there may have been some changes to the job itself. It’s important for us to determine if those changes are ones that can be handled by the returning employee. We seek to discover if there are any limitations that the employee may have before green-lighting the way back to the workplace.

Can the job at work be modified? In some cases – even when the working conditions may have remained the same – the returning worker may have some of those limitations we mentioned. If so, we seek to discover if any modifications can be made at the workplace to make the transition back to work more comfortable for the employee. It’s also important to know if further physiotherapy or other forms of rehabilitation are necessary.

Has there has been a change in the employee’s health? There are times when an injury can significantly change a person’s health. After all, rehabilitation can certainly take a toll on a person. So while an injury may be healed, the employee may still require other methods of recovery in order to achieve greater strength, energy and endurance levels. Before one can return to work, he or she clearly needs to be healthy enough to do so.

Is there a new medical condition that may limit a returning worker’s effectiveness? If an employee’s health has changed, the job description for that employee may need to change as well. In some cases, a person can return to work, but not necessarily to do the same tasks that were asked of him or her before the injury or illness took place. If a limitation reduces or prevents a person from performing a job effectively, a new position may be a better fit.

Can the employee safely return to work? There are, of course, those situations when an employee is simply not healthy enough to return to a job in any capacity. Further rehabilitation is necessary in order to get a person to a state of readiness. And this is very important. Returning an employee to the workplace before he or she is capable of doing the work is bad for both the business and the employee. A home assessment helps greatly to make the right decision.

Of course, there are a variety of other questions that we answer to make sure an employee is ready to return to the job. For more information about our Home Assessments, please feel free to call us at 204-478-6644.

6 Steps To Creating The Perfect Résumé

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target resume illustration designThere are many reasons why we may, at some point in our lives, need to take a long layoff from work. In some cases, we may actually have to leave our jobs in order to attend to more pressing matters. Needless to say, our health should always come first. So when battling an illness or injury that requires a long recovery period, it can be difficult trying to get assimilated with a professional working environment again.

Not only may we have distanced ourselves from lifestyles that involve daily work schedules, but we may have also forgotten what it takes to complete adequate résumés. It’s hard to imagine yourself starting from scratch, isn’t it? But, believe it or not, many people have to begin their careers all over again after unexpected occurrences take place in their lives. This can actually be a good thing. But it takes a good résumé to get you started! Here are six steps to writing the perfect one.

1. Tailor it to the specific position you’re applying for. On BusinessInsider.com, Vivian Giang and Melissa Stanger write that a generic résumé won’t generally do the trick. It’s important to “mold the information to reflect what your potential employer is looking for in an ideal job candidate.” Naturally, you may have to make revisions to your résumé depending on the different industries within which you may be applying.

2. Include professional modes of contact. It’s important to remember the fact that you are looking to an impress an employer. Providing e-mail addresses and phone numbers may seem like the easy part. But as Barbara Safani points out on Aol.com, if your email address doesn’t reflect a sense of professionalism (partygirl7@aol.com is her example) and your outgoing voicemail message is done in a “goofy voice”, it will “encourage recruiters to walk away.”

3. The length of your résumé should reflect years of experience. Giang and Stanger remind us that, although you may be proud of your various accomplishments, they may not all be relevant to your potential employers. “Cut it down,” they insist, noting that if you’re in your twenties, a one-page résumé will suffice. However, those with more than ten years of experience can feel free to add second pages.

4. Use strong language. Now, of course, we’re not referring to using any inappropriate terms to describe yourself. Instead, you should try to make use of words that connote a great sense of confidence and strength. “Refrain from using subjective words like ‘loyal’ or ‘trustworthy’ to explain your candidacy,” advises Safani, “Omit phrases such as ‘responsible for’ or ‘duties included’ from your résumé; opt for stronger language such as ‘managed’ or ‘oversaw.’”

5. Use plenty of white space to draw the reader’s eye to specific items. An abundance of information can be distracting. Giang and Stanger point out that a résumé that is pleasing to the eye can be a lot more effective than one that is crammed with information. Sometimes, keeping it concise is key. Focus on the most relevant points of your job history and experience so that they are seen as highlighted reasons to hire you.

6. Explain your layoff. This may be a tip that most people wouldn’t consider. Especially if you’re seeking employment after a long layoff, it may be important to explain why. “If you left the workplace to take care of a child or aging parent, explain that right on the résumé,” insists Safani, “Don’t make the reader guess what you were doing during that gap. Their assumptions will rarely work in your favour.”

At Independence Incorporated, we proudly offer Resume Preparation services. For more information, call us at 204-478-6644.